Happy back to school time! Here’s some proof that I’m making at least a bit of progress on something! It’s down to half size right now so you can see a larger version that before, and I’ve started getting the bg in. was almost done with the bg lines when I decided to lessen the angle of the image, and I’ve learned that you want to get that stuff done right the first time o-o

I just moved into college for my second year and am about to head off to my first class of the semester.  I don’t have any sketches from the days I’ve missed due to being so busy packing, and I’ll be holding off on some art stuff until I’ve gotten settled into the rhythm of college again.

Expect more Child of Light and also some Monster Hunter sketches when I return :D 

While I await asks, here’s an  Óengus for your enjoyment.
So far he’s my absolute favorite character in the game. He’s just a huge tank and super lovable, and his design is made of absolute love~ I just want to hug him and squeeze him and overly thank the person who designed him.

While I await asks, here’s an  Óengus for your enjoyment.

So far he’s my absolute favorite character in the game. He’s just a huge tank and super lovable, and his design is made of absolute love~ I just want to hug him and squeeze him and overly thank the person who designed him.

I’ve seen this a lot from people I follow, but I never chimed in due to not having much of my story material up. But now since I’ve got a few bits and pieces of shifters up, how about it?

If you guys have any questions about Shifters or the world/universe they come from, my ask box is open! Who knows, there might even be some more sketches for some answers. :)

lochingbird:

Oh my! Welcome new watchers and I must say, you’ve really swamped my dash! I logged in today to find that my werewolf-mom image had sprung up over 100 notes, and apparently it’s still going around! I’m really glad you all enjoy that piece!

I got some more watchers and I am also completely floored! 500+ Notes! I can’t believe so many people liked them : )

And sorry there were not sketches for the past few days, I had some people over and sketching did not happen. Be prepared for more Child of Light stuff though. I’ll try and keep it spoiler free(as you all should on comments to me as well, since I haven’t finished it yet) but if you think I might spoil something for you, I’ll be tagging it with the games name : )

Have some Child of Light.
First hour or two into the game, and it’s pretty interesting. Flying around without something like a stamina meter or having to keep your altitude is kind of refreshing. I’m still trying to get a grip on the attack system though.  

Have some Child of Light.

First hour or two into the game, and it’s pretty interesting. Flying around without something like a stamina meter or having to keep your altitude is kind of refreshing. I’m still trying to get a grip on the attack system though.  

Both rupture images. If you compare them with this then you’ll be able to see how rupturing and trapping are pretty much opposites, both in what they do, and how they look through Sight.
Also, because I didn’t think to mention this before because it didn’t occur to me, brighter areas indicate more active energy. Areas that are darker or black show either a lack of energy(black) or dormant energy(can be very close to black, but is usually at least slightly tinted) Both rupture images. If you compare them with this then you’ll be able to see how rupturing and trapping are pretty much opposites, both in what they do, and how they look through Sight.
Also, because I didn’t think to mention this before because it didn’t occur to me, brighter areas indicate more active energy. Areas that are darker or black show either a lack of energy(black) or dormant energy(can be very close to black, but is usually at least slightly tinted)

Both rupture images. If you compare them with this then you’ll be able to see how rupturing and trapping are pretty much opposites, both in what they do, and how they look through Sight.

Also, because I didn’t think to mention this before because it didn’t occur to me, brighter areas indicate more active energy. Areas that are darker or black show either a lack of energy(black) or dormant energy(can be very close to black, but is usually at least slightly tinted)

So you’ve seen what happens when a Shifter ruptures, and now you can see what happens when the opposite happens. When a shifter is prone to rupturing when injured, their body sends waves of energy stores to the injury to try and heal it as quickly as possible. This means they loose a grand amount of energy, but they don’t have to deal with being injured for long(unless they shift, in which case rupturing will happen).
When a shifter is prone to Trapping, energy is not rushed to the injury but rather away from it. They attempt to minimize energy loss by keeping their energy stores as far away from the injury sight as possible. Although they don’t loose as much energy as the other, they remain injured for as long as they keep energy away from the wound. They usually heal their wounds over time by leaking small amounts of energy back into the site. When this kind tries to shift while injured, instead of the injury ballooning out and bursting, it will instead refuse to shift with the rest of the person.
Hope you enjoyed the sketch and little fun fact of the day!
Sometime I’ll upload both the regular rupture image and it’s Sight version so that you all can see how that looks. So you’ve seen what happens when a Shifter ruptures, and now you can see what happens when the opposite happens. When a shifter is prone to rupturing when injured, their body sends waves of energy stores to the injury to try and heal it as quickly as possible. This means they loose a grand amount of energy, but they don’t have to deal with being injured for long(unless they shift, in which case rupturing will happen).
When a shifter is prone to Trapping, energy is not rushed to the injury but rather away from it. They attempt to minimize energy loss by keeping their energy stores as far away from the injury sight as possible. Although they don’t loose as much energy as the other, they remain injured for as long as they keep energy away from the wound. They usually heal their wounds over time by leaking small amounts of energy back into the site. When this kind tries to shift while injured, instead of the injury ballooning out and bursting, it will instead refuse to shift with the rest of the person.
Hope you enjoyed the sketch and little fun fact of the day!
Sometime I’ll upload both the regular rupture image and it’s Sight version so that you all can see how that looks.

So you’ve seen what happens when a Shifter ruptures, and now you can see what happens when the opposite happens. When a shifter is prone to rupturing when injured, their body sends waves of energy stores to the injury to try and heal it as quickly as possible. This means they loose a grand amount of energy, but they don’t have to deal with being injured for long(unless they shift, in which case rupturing will happen).

When a shifter is prone to Trapping, energy is not rushed to the injury but rather away from it. They attempt to minimize energy loss by keeping their energy stores as far away from the injury sight as possible. Although they don’t loose as much energy as the other, they remain injured for as long as they keep energy away from the wound. They usually heal their wounds over time by leaking small amounts of energy back into the site. When this kind tries to shift while injured, instead of the injury ballooning out and bursting, it will instead refuse to shift with the rest of the person.

Hope you enjoyed the sketch and little fun fact of the day!

Sometime I’ll upload both the regular rupture image and it’s Sight version so that you all can see how that looks.

Oh my! Welcome new watchers and I must say, you’ve really swamped my dash! I logged in today to find that my werewolf-mom image had sprung up over 100 notes, and apparently it’s still going around! I’m really glad you all enjoy that piece!

Some sketches from the past 3 days. I figured I didn’t want to flood your inboxes with such small stuff, so I’d keep it until I had a bit more to do in one post.
The only ones that are really anything relevant are the first and last ones. First image is a quick idea at how Sen would walk/run in her shorter form(really awkward running and flopping around everywhere with flailing limbs to the side).(first 3 sketches are of a walk cycle, and the rest are for her running) The last image includes a newer character that I’m just gonna call Sloth for now. He’s connected with Amara somehow, but I’m not sure exactly how, so I’d rather keep his name unknown for right now.
Sloth is a character of many limbs, and it is very fun to figure out what all 8 of the are doing at one time. Some sketches from the past 3 days. I figured I didn’t want to flood your inboxes with such small stuff, so I’d keep it until I had a bit more to do in one post.
The only ones that are really anything relevant are the first and last ones. First image is a quick idea at how Sen would walk/run in her shorter form(really awkward running and flopping around everywhere with flailing limbs to the side).(first 3 sketches are of a walk cycle, and the rest are for her running) The last image includes a newer character that I’m just gonna call Sloth for now. He’s connected with Amara somehow, but I’m not sure exactly how, so I’d rather keep his name unknown for right now.
Sloth is a character of many limbs, and it is very fun to figure out what all 8 of the are doing at one time. Some sketches from the past 3 days. I figured I didn’t want to flood your inboxes with such small stuff, so I’d keep it until I had a bit more to do in one post.
The only ones that are really anything relevant are the first and last ones. First image is a quick idea at how Sen would walk/run in her shorter form(really awkward running and flopping around everywhere with flailing limbs to the side).(first 3 sketches are of a walk cycle, and the rest are for her running) The last image includes a newer character that I’m just gonna call Sloth for now. He’s connected with Amara somehow, but I’m not sure exactly how, so I’d rather keep his name unknown for right now.
Sloth is a character of many limbs, and it is very fun to figure out what all 8 of the are doing at one time.

Some sketches from the past 3 days. I figured I didn’t want to flood your inboxes with such small stuff, so I’d keep it until I had a bit more to do in one post.

The only ones that are really anything relevant are the first and last ones. First image is a quick idea at how Sen would walk/run in her shorter form(really awkward running and flopping around everywhere with flailing limbs to the side).(first 3 sketches are of a walk cycle, and the rest are for her running) The last image includes a newer character that I’m just gonna call Sloth for now. He’s connected with Amara somehow, but I’m not sure exactly how, so I’d rather keep his name unknown for right now.

Sloth is a character of many limbs, and it is very fun to figure out what all 8 of the are doing at one time.

Ok. So like, I always seem to forget my age when it comes to art. So I’m always hard on myself, telling myself I have to be better so I can be on par with all these people in the field I have interest of going into.

Then I realize that most of them are 10-20 years older than me, if not more.

I think it’s finally time that I sit back a little and stop berating myself as much. In 10-20 years I’ll be on par with how they are today, and that’s perfectly okay. I don’t have to reach that level by tomorrow, next week, or even in the next 5 years. I have plenty of time, and as long as I have a push to keep moving forward, then one day I’ll get to where I want to be. Who knows, maybe I’ll actually grow more once I stop being so harsh. If not, then that’s okay too, because I’ll at least be able to enjoy the trip a little bit more.

Got to preorder both Omega Ruby and Alpha Sapphire! But due to my b-day and christmas being not to far away from each other, and the release date being between them, then I decided to go ahead and use the gift card(the reason we were there in the first place) on Child of the Light.

I’m waiting for it to download right now, but if my sketches start including stuff from that, then you’ll know why.

Also I’ll be making a post with all the sketches/warmups from the last 3 days, since I didn’t post anything during that time. All of these dailies will be posted under the tag ‘sketches’, just so you know in case you get tired of them. Ones that are relevant to my story will also be tagged ‘inspired’ so you can look a them later if you want to see those, but not all the rest of the stuff.

lenalis:

psicologicamenteblog:

Source: Understanding the phenomenon of synesthesia.
Follow Francesca Mura on Pinterest

Associative grapheme-color is my biggest one, and it’s also one of the few places where my perception stays consistent - 9 will always be a rich plum, L has always been the teal that I love, T has always been orange-to-ocher, a has always been Crayola red, C has been Crayola blue, things like that.
I pick up on pronunciations and vocabulary in other languages by translating their colorscapes, and synesthesia is why I picked up so switfly on Arabic. When presented with a word whose root I knew but couldn’t quite recall, it often came down to ‘translating’ the colors that came with the syllable order. Arabic is the only other language I’m fluent in, but when I hear someone else speak another language, I can pick up nuanced pronunciation immediately. My instructors would also ask me if I had a history with music (I do), because music students tend to pick up on audio intricacies a bit better when it comes to languages that are so disparate from their mother tongues. I never could sight read for shit, but once I practiced a piece, I’d play it from memory by connecting fingerings and colorscapes, so I feel like that tied in with my language, too.
Most of what pings my synesthesia is visual, and I’ll see an image and get flavors and textures from it in a way that usually manifests between my tongue and the roof of my mouth, but particularly powerful stimuli will cause rhythmic sensations, like hollow plucking almost, in other parts of my body (trypophilic response tends to be most localized to my sternum and feels like someone picking at my xiphoid process with a fingernail).
Something I never see in infographics like this, but that comes up when I talk to other synesthetes, is that individual people in my life develop colorscapes that I associate with them, and that change over time for whatever reason (possibly familiarity with the person, possibly because these are just transient perceptions to begin with and if not committed to memory they may just shift, never figured it out). There’s never any common ground between people, and it’s never a ‘good’ or ‘bad’ read that I get, much like how synesthesia isn’t a disorder but isn’t normal either. People may present to me with a similar hazy grit but it represents totally different aspects of these individuals (seeing that grit with someone who turned out to be an asshole doesn’t translate to me meeting someone new who has grit so I can go “A-ha! You’ll be an asshole!”).
Not sure where I was going with this..
Visual cues result in tastes and textures, audio cues result in both as well and to a lesser extent colors, letters and digits can have consistent representations but develop into independent gradients and textures again once they’re in a word. Much of my character naming and development are synesthetic in nature, seemingly partially constructed already but pick up qualities as I make sense of their scapes.
lenalis:

psicologicamenteblog:

Source: Understanding the phenomenon of synesthesia.
Follow Francesca Mura on Pinterest

Associative grapheme-color is my biggest one, and it’s also one of the few places where my perception stays consistent - 9 will always be a rich plum, L has always been the teal that I love, T has always been orange-to-ocher, a has always been Crayola red, C has been Crayola blue, things like that.
I pick up on pronunciations and vocabulary in other languages by translating their colorscapes, and synesthesia is why I picked up so switfly on Arabic. When presented with a word whose root I knew but couldn’t quite recall, it often came down to ‘translating’ the colors that came with the syllable order. Arabic is the only other language I’m fluent in, but when I hear someone else speak another language, I can pick up nuanced pronunciation immediately. My instructors would also ask me if I had a history with music (I do), because music students tend to pick up on audio intricacies a bit better when it comes to languages that are so disparate from their mother tongues. I never could sight read for shit, but once I practiced a piece, I’d play it from memory by connecting fingerings and colorscapes, so I feel like that tied in with my language, too.
Most of what pings my synesthesia is visual, and I’ll see an image and get flavors and textures from it in a way that usually manifests between my tongue and the roof of my mouth, but particularly powerful stimuli will cause rhythmic sensations, like hollow plucking almost, in other parts of my body (trypophilic response tends to be most localized to my sternum and feels like someone picking at my xiphoid process with a fingernail).
Something I never see in infographics like this, but that comes up when I talk to other synesthetes, is that individual people in my life develop colorscapes that I associate with them, and that change over time for whatever reason (possibly familiarity with the person, possibly because these are just transient perceptions to begin with and if not committed to memory they may just shift, never figured it out). There’s never any common ground between people, and it’s never a ‘good’ or ‘bad’ read that I get, much like how synesthesia isn’t a disorder but isn’t normal either. People may present to me with a similar hazy grit but it represents totally different aspects of these individuals (seeing that grit with someone who turned out to be an asshole doesn’t translate to me meeting someone new who has grit so I can go “A-ha! You’ll be an asshole!”).
Not sure where I was going with this..
Visual cues result in tastes and textures, audio cues result in both as well and to a lesser extent colors, letters and digits can have consistent representations but develop into independent gradients and textures again once they’re in a word. Much of my character naming and development are synesthetic in nature, seemingly partially constructed already but pick up qualities as I make sense of their scapes.
lenalis:

psicologicamenteblog:

Source: Understanding the phenomenon of synesthesia.
Follow Francesca Mura on Pinterest

Associative grapheme-color is my biggest one, and it’s also one of the few places where my perception stays consistent - 9 will always be a rich plum, L has always been the teal that I love, T has always been orange-to-ocher, a has always been Crayola red, C has been Crayola blue, things like that.
I pick up on pronunciations and vocabulary in other languages by translating their colorscapes, and synesthesia is why I picked up so switfly on Arabic. When presented with a word whose root I knew but couldn’t quite recall, it often came down to ‘translating’ the colors that came with the syllable order. Arabic is the only other language I’m fluent in, but when I hear someone else speak another language, I can pick up nuanced pronunciation immediately. My instructors would also ask me if I had a history with music (I do), because music students tend to pick up on audio intricacies a bit better when it comes to languages that are so disparate from their mother tongues. I never could sight read for shit, but once I practiced a piece, I’d play it from memory by connecting fingerings and colorscapes, so I feel like that tied in with my language, too.
Most of what pings my synesthesia is visual, and I’ll see an image and get flavors and textures from it in a way that usually manifests between my tongue and the roof of my mouth, but particularly powerful stimuli will cause rhythmic sensations, like hollow plucking almost, in other parts of my body (trypophilic response tends to be most localized to my sternum and feels like someone picking at my xiphoid process with a fingernail).
Something I never see in infographics like this, but that comes up when I talk to other synesthetes, is that individual people in my life develop colorscapes that I associate with them, and that change over time for whatever reason (possibly familiarity with the person, possibly because these are just transient perceptions to begin with and if not committed to memory they may just shift, never figured it out). There’s never any common ground between people, and it’s never a ‘good’ or ‘bad’ read that I get, much like how synesthesia isn’t a disorder but isn’t normal either. People may present to me with a similar hazy grit but it represents totally different aspects of these individuals (seeing that grit with someone who turned out to be an asshole doesn’t translate to me meeting someone new who has grit so I can go “A-ha! You’ll be an asshole!”).
Not sure where I was going with this..
Visual cues result in tastes and textures, audio cues result in both as well and to a lesser extent colors, letters and digits can have consistent representations but develop into independent gradients and textures again once they’re in a word. Much of my character naming and development are synesthetic in nature, seemingly partially constructed already but pick up qualities as I make sense of their scapes.
lenalis:

psicologicamenteblog:

Source: Understanding the phenomenon of synesthesia.
Follow Francesca Mura on Pinterest

Associative grapheme-color is my biggest one, and it’s also one of the few places where my perception stays consistent - 9 will always be a rich plum, L has always been the teal that I love, T has always been orange-to-ocher, a has always been Crayola red, C has been Crayola blue, things like that.
I pick up on pronunciations and vocabulary in other languages by translating their colorscapes, and synesthesia is why I picked up so switfly on Arabic. When presented with a word whose root I knew but couldn’t quite recall, it often came down to ‘translating’ the colors that came with the syllable order. Arabic is the only other language I’m fluent in, but when I hear someone else speak another language, I can pick up nuanced pronunciation immediately. My instructors would also ask me if I had a history with music (I do), because music students tend to pick up on audio intricacies a bit better when it comes to languages that are so disparate from their mother tongues. I never could sight read for shit, but once I practiced a piece, I’d play it from memory by connecting fingerings and colorscapes, so I feel like that tied in with my language, too.
Most of what pings my synesthesia is visual, and I’ll see an image and get flavors and textures from it in a way that usually manifests between my tongue and the roof of my mouth, but particularly powerful stimuli will cause rhythmic sensations, like hollow plucking almost, in other parts of my body (trypophilic response tends to be most localized to my sternum and feels like someone picking at my xiphoid process with a fingernail).
Something I never see in infographics like this, but that comes up when I talk to other synesthetes, is that individual people in my life develop colorscapes that I associate with them, and that change over time for whatever reason (possibly familiarity with the person, possibly because these are just transient perceptions to begin with and if not committed to memory they may just shift, never figured it out). There’s never any common ground between people, and it’s never a ‘good’ or ‘bad’ read that I get, much like how synesthesia isn’t a disorder but isn’t normal either. People may present to me with a similar hazy grit but it represents totally different aspects of these individuals (seeing that grit with someone who turned out to be an asshole doesn’t translate to me meeting someone new who has grit so I can go “A-ha! You’ll be an asshole!”).
Not sure where I was going with this..
Visual cues result in tastes and textures, audio cues result in both as well and to a lesser extent colors, letters and digits can have consistent representations but develop into independent gradients and textures again once they’re in a word. Much of my character naming and development are synesthetic in nature, seemingly partially constructed already but pick up qualities as I make sense of their scapes.
lenalis:

psicologicamenteblog:

Source: Understanding the phenomenon of synesthesia.
Follow Francesca Mura on Pinterest

Associative grapheme-color is my biggest one, and it’s also one of the few places where my perception stays consistent - 9 will always be a rich plum, L has always been the teal that I love, T has always been orange-to-ocher, a has always been Crayola red, C has been Crayola blue, things like that.
I pick up on pronunciations and vocabulary in other languages by translating their colorscapes, and synesthesia is why I picked up so switfly on Arabic. When presented with a word whose root I knew but couldn’t quite recall, it often came down to ‘translating’ the colors that came with the syllable order. Arabic is the only other language I’m fluent in, but when I hear someone else speak another language, I can pick up nuanced pronunciation immediately. My instructors would also ask me if I had a history with music (I do), because music students tend to pick up on audio intricacies a bit better when it comes to languages that are so disparate from their mother tongues. I never could sight read for shit, but once I practiced a piece, I’d play it from memory by connecting fingerings and colorscapes, so I feel like that tied in with my language, too.
Most of what pings my synesthesia is visual, and I’ll see an image and get flavors and textures from it in a way that usually manifests between my tongue and the roof of my mouth, but particularly powerful stimuli will cause rhythmic sensations, like hollow plucking almost, in other parts of my body (trypophilic response tends to be most localized to my sternum and feels like someone picking at my xiphoid process with a fingernail).
Something I never see in infographics like this, but that comes up when I talk to other synesthetes, is that individual people in my life develop colorscapes that I associate with them, and that change over time for whatever reason (possibly familiarity with the person, possibly because these are just transient perceptions to begin with and if not committed to memory they may just shift, never figured it out). There’s never any common ground between people, and it’s never a ‘good’ or ‘bad’ read that I get, much like how synesthesia isn’t a disorder but isn’t normal either. People may present to me with a similar hazy grit but it represents totally different aspects of these individuals (seeing that grit with someone who turned out to be an asshole doesn’t translate to me meeting someone new who has grit so I can go “A-ha! You’ll be an asshole!”).
Not sure where I was going with this..
Visual cues result in tastes and textures, audio cues result in both as well and to a lesser extent colors, letters and digits can have consistent representations but develop into independent gradients and textures again once they’re in a word. Much of my character naming and development are synesthetic in nature, seemingly partially constructed already but pick up qualities as I make sense of their scapes.
lenalis:

psicologicamenteblog:

Source: Understanding the phenomenon of synesthesia.
Follow Francesca Mura on Pinterest

Associative grapheme-color is my biggest one, and it’s also one of the few places where my perception stays consistent - 9 will always be a rich plum, L has always been the teal that I love, T has always been orange-to-ocher, a has always been Crayola red, C has been Crayola blue, things like that.
I pick up on pronunciations and vocabulary in other languages by translating their colorscapes, and synesthesia is why I picked up so switfly on Arabic. When presented with a word whose root I knew but couldn’t quite recall, it often came down to ‘translating’ the colors that came with the syllable order. Arabic is the only other language I’m fluent in, but when I hear someone else speak another language, I can pick up nuanced pronunciation immediately. My instructors would also ask me if I had a history with music (I do), because music students tend to pick up on audio intricacies a bit better when it comes to languages that are so disparate from their mother tongues. I never could sight read for shit, but once I practiced a piece, I’d play it from memory by connecting fingerings and colorscapes, so I feel like that tied in with my language, too.
Most of what pings my synesthesia is visual, and I’ll see an image and get flavors and textures from it in a way that usually manifests between my tongue and the roof of my mouth, but particularly powerful stimuli will cause rhythmic sensations, like hollow plucking almost, in other parts of my body (trypophilic response tends to be most localized to my sternum and feels like someone picking at my xiphoid process with a fingernail).
Something I never see in infographics like this, but that comes up when I talk to other synesthetes, is that individual people in my life develop colorscapes that I associate with them, and that change over time for whatever reason (possibly familiarity with the person, possibly because these are just transient perceptions to begin with and if not committed to memory they may just shift, never figured it out). There’s never any common ground between people, and it’s never a ‘good’ or ‘bad’ read that I get, much like how synesthesia isn’t a disorder but isn’t normal either. People may present to me with a similar hazy grit but it represents totally different aspects of these individuals (seeing that grit with someone who turned out to be an asshole doesn’t translate to me meeting someone new who has grit so I can go “A-ha! You’ll be an asshole!”).
Not sure where I was going with this..
Visual cues result in tastes and textures, audio cues result in both as well and to a lesser extent colors, letters and digits can have consistent representations but develop into independent gradients and textures again once they’re in a word. Much of my character naming and development are synesthetic in nature, seemingly partially constructed already but pick up qualities as I make sense of their scapes.
lenalis:

psicologicamenteblog:

Source: Understanding the phenomenon of synesthesia.
Follow Francesca Mura on Pinterest

Associative grapheme-color is my biggest one, and it’s also one of the few places where my perception stays consistent - 9 will always be a rich plum, L has always been the teal that I love, T has always been orange-to-ocher, a has always been Crayola red, C has been Crayola blue, things like that.
I pick up on pronunciations and vocabulary in other languages by translating their colorscapes, and synesthesia is why I picked up so switfly on Arabic. When presented with a word whose root I knew but couldn’t quite recall, it often came down to ‘translating’ the colors that came with the syllable order. Arabic is the only other language I’m fluent in, but when I hear someone else speak another language, I can pick up nuanced pronunciation immediately. My instructors would also ask me if I had a history with music (I do), because music students tend to pick up on audio intricacies a bit better when it comes to languages that are so disparate from their mother tongues. I never could sight read for shit, but once I practiced a piece, I’d play it from memory by connecting fingerings and colorscapes, so I feel like that tied in with my language, too.
Most of what pings my synesthesia is visual, and I’ll see an image and get flavors and textures from it in a way that usually manifests between my tongue and the roof of my mouth, but particularly powerful stimuli will cause rhythmic sensations, like hollow plucking almost, in other parts of my body (trypophilic response tends to be most localized to my sternum and feels like someone picking at my xiphoid process with a fingernail).
Something I never see in infographics like this, but that comes up when I talk to other synesthetes, is that individual people in my life develop colorscapes that I associate with them, and that change over time for whatever reason (possibly familiarity with the person, possibly because these are just transient perceptions to begin with and if not committed to memory they may just shift, never figured it out). There’s never any common ground between people, and it’s never a ‘good’ or ‘bad’ read that I get, much like how synesthesia isn’t a disorder but isn’t normal either. People may present to me with a similar hazy grit but it represents totally different aspects of these individuals (seeing that grit with someone who turned out to be an asshole doesn’t translate to me meeting someone new who has grit so I can go “A-ha! You’ll be an asshole!”).
Not sure where I was going with this..
Visual cues result in tastes and textures, audio cues result in both as well and to a lesser extent colors, letters and digits can have consistent representations but develop into independent gradients and textures again once they’re in a word. Much of my character naming and development are synesthetic in nature, seemingly partially constructed already but pick up qualities as I make sense of their scapes.
lenalis:

psicologicamenteblog:

Source: Understanding the phenomenon of synesthesia.
Follow Francesca Mura on Pinterest

Associative grapheme-color is my biggest one, and it’s also one of the few places where my perception stays consistent - 9 will always be a rich plum, L has always been the teal that I love, T has always been orange-to-ocher, a has always been Crayola red, C has been Crayola blue, things like that.
I pick up on pronunciations and vocabulary in other languages by translating their colorscapes, and synesthesia is why I picked up so switfly on Arabic. When presented with a word whose root I knew but couldn’t quite recall, it often came down to ‘translating’ the colors that came with the syllable order. Arabic is the only other language I’m fluent in, but when I hear someone else speak another language, I can pick up nuanced pronunciation immediately. My instructors would also ask me if I had a history with music (I do), because music students tend to pick up on audio intricacies a bit better when it comes to languages that are so disparate from their mother tongues. I never could sight read for shit, but once I practiced a piece, I’d play it from memory by connecting fingerings and colorscapes, so I feel like that tied in with my language, too.
Most of what pings my synesthesia is visual, and I’ll see an image and get flavors and textures from it in a way that usually manifests between my tongue and the roof of my mouth, but particularly powerful stimuli will cause rhythmic sensations, like hollow plucking almost, in other parts of my body (trypophilic response tends to be most localized to my sternum and feels like someone picking at my xiphoid process with a fingernail).
Something I never see in infographics like this, but that comes up when I talk to other synesthetes, is that individual people in my life develop colorscapes that I associate with them, and that change over time for whatever reason (possibly familiarity with the person, possibly because these are just transient perceptions to begin with and if not committed to memory they may just shift, never figured it out). There’s never any common ground between people, and it’s never a ‘good’ or ‘bad’ read that I get, much like how synesthesia isn’t a disorder but isn’t normal either. People may present to me with a similar hazy grit but it represents totally different aspects of these individuals (seeing that grit with someone who turned out to be an asshole doesn’t translate to me meeting someone new who has grit so I can go “A-ha! You’ll be an asshole!”).
Not sure where I was going with this..
Visual cues result in tastes and textures, audio cues result in both as well and to a lesser extent colors, letters and digits can have consistent representations but develop into independent gradients and textures again once they’re in a word. Much of my character naming and development are synesthetic in nature, seemingly partially constructed already but pick up qualities as I make sense of their scapes.
lenalis:

psicologicamenteblog:

Source: Understanding the phenomenon of synesthesia.
Follow Francesca Mura on Pinterest

Associative grapheme-color is my biggest one, and it’s also one of the few places where my perception stays consistent - 9 will always be a rich plum, L has always been the teal that I love, T has always been orange-to-ocher, a has always been Crayola red, C has been Crayola blue, things like that.
I pick up on pronunciations and vocabulary in other languages by translating their colorscapes, and synesthesia is why I picked up so switfly on Arabic. When presented with a word whose root I knew but couldn’t quite recall, it often came down to ‘translating’ the colors that came with the syllable order. Arabic is the only other language I’m fluent in, but when I hear someone else speak another language, I can pick up nuanced pronunciation immediately. My instructors would also ask me if I had a history with music (I do), because music students tend to pick up on audio intricacies a bit better when it comes to languages that are so disparate from their mother tongues. I never could sight read for shit, but once I practiced a piece, I’d play it from memory by connecting fingerings and colorscapes, so I feel like that tied in with my language, too.
Most of what pings my synesthesia is visual, and I’ll see an image and get flavors and textures from it in a way that usually manifests between my tongue and the roof of my mouth, but particularly powerful stimuli will cause rhythmic sensations, like hollow plucking almost, in other parts of my body (trypophilic response tends to be most localized to my sternum and feels like someone picking at my xiphoid process with a fingernail).
Something I never see in infographics like this, but that comes up when I talk to other synesthetes, is that individual people in my life develop colorscapes that I associate with them, and that change over time for whatever reason (possibly familiarity with the person, possibly because these are just transient perceptions to begin with and if not committed to memory they may just shift, never figured it out). There’s never any common ground between people, and it’s never a ‘good’ or ‘bad’ read that I get, much like how synesthesia isn’t a disorder but isn’t normal either. People may present to me with a similar hazy grit but it represents totally different aspects of these individuals (seeing that grit with someone who turned out to be an asshole doesn’t translate to me meeting someone new who has grit so I can go “A-ha! You’ll be an asshole!”).
Not sure where I was going with this..
Visual cues result in tastes and textures, audio cues result in both as well and to a lesser extent colors, letters and digits can have consistent representations but develop into independent gradients and textures again once they’re in a word. Much of my character naming and development are synesthetic in nature, seemingly partially constructed already but pick up qualities as I make sense of their scapes.
lenalis:

psicologicamenteblog:

Source: Understanding the phenomenon of synesthesia.
Follow Francesca Mura on Pinterest

Associative grapheme-color is my biggest one, and it’s also one of the few places where my perception stays consistent - 9 will always be a rich plum, L has always been the teal that I love, T has always been orange-to-ocher, a has always been Crayola red, C has been Crayola blue, things like that.
I pick up on pronunciations and vocabulary in other languages by translating their colorscapes, and synesthesia is why I picked up so switfly on Arabic. When presented with a word whose root I knew but couldn’t quite recall, it often came down to ‘translating’ the colors that came with the syllable order. Arabic is the only other language I’m fluent in, but when I hear someone else speak another language, I can pick up nuanced pronunciation immediately. My instructors would also ask me if I had a history with music (I do), because music students tend to pick up on audio intricacies a bit better when it comes to languages that are so disparate from their mother tongues. I never could sight read for shit, but once I practiced a piece, I’d play it from memory by connecting fingerings and colorscapes, so I feel like that tied in with my language, too.
Most of what pings my synesthesia is visual, and I’ll see an image and get flavors and textures from it in a way that usually manifests between my tongue and the roof of my mouth, but particularly powerful stimuli will cause rhythmic sensations, like hollow plucking almost, in other parts of my body (trypophilic response tends to be most localized to my sternum and feels like someone picking at my xiphoid process with a fingernail).
Something I never see in infographics like this, but that comes up when I talk to other synesthetes, is that individual people in my life develop colorscapes that I associate with them, and that change over time for whatever reason (possibly familiarity with the person, possibly because these are just transient perceptions to begin with and if not committed to memory they may just shift, never figured it out). There’s never any common ground between people, and it’s never a ‘good’ or ‘bad’ read that I get, much like how synesthesia isn’t a disorder but isn’t normal either. People may present to me with a similar hazy grit but it represents totally different aspects of these individuals (seeing that grit with someone who turned out to be an asshole doesn’t translate to me meeting someone new who has grit so I can go “A-ha! You’ll be an asshole!”).
Not sure where I was going with this..
Visual cues result in tastes and textures, audio cues result in both as well and to a lesser extent colors, letters and digits can have consistent representations but develop into independent gradients and textures again once they’re in a word. Much of my character naming and development are synesthetic in nature, seemingly partially constructed already but pick up qualities as I make sense of their scapes.

lenalis:

psicologicamenteblog:

Source: Understanding the phenomenon of synesthesia.

Follow Francesca Mura on Pinterest

Associative grapheme-color is my biggest one, and it’s also one of the few places where my perception stays consistent - 9 will always be a rich plum, L has always been the teal that I love, T has always been orange-to-ocher, a has always been Crayola red, C has been Crayola blue, things like that.

I pick up on pronunciations and vocabulary in other languages by translating their colorscapes, and synesthesia is why I picked up so switfly on Arabic. When presented with a word whose root I knew but couldn’t quite recall, it often came down to ‘translating’ the colors that came with the syllable order. Arabic is the only other language I’m fluent in, but when I hear someone else speak another language, I can pick up nuanced pronunciation immediately. My instructors would also ask me if I had a history with music (I do), because music students tend to pick up on audio intricacies a bit better when it comes to languages that are so disparate from their mother tongues. I never could sight read for shit, but once I practiced a piece, I’d play it from memory by connecting fingerings and colorscapes, so I feel like that tied in with my language, too.

Most of what pings my synesthesia is visual, and I’ll see an image and get flavors and textures from it in a way that usually manifests between my tongue and the roof of my mouth, but particularly powerful stimuli will cause rhythmic sensations, like hollow plucking almost, in other parts of my body (trypophilic response tends to be most localized to my sternum and feels like someone picking at my xiphoid process with a fingernail).

Something I never see in infographics like this, but that comes up when I talk to other synesthetes, is that individual people in my life develop colorscapes that I associate with them, and that change over time for whatever reason (possibly familiarity with the person, possibly because these are just transient perceptions to begin with and if not committed to memory they may just shift, never figured it out). There’s never any common ground between people, and it’s never a ‘good’ or ‘bad’ read that I get, much like how synesthesia isn’t a disorder but isn’t normal either. People may present to me with a similar hazy grit but it represents totally different aspects of these individuals (seeing that grit with someone who turned out to be an asshole doesn’t translate to me meeting someone new who has grit so I can go “A-ha! You’ll be an asshole!”).

Not sure where I was going with this..

Visual cues result in tastes and textures, audio cues result in both as well and to a lesser extent colors, letters and digits can have consistent representations but develop into independent gradients and textures again once they’re in a word. Much of my character naming and development are synesthetic in nature, seemingly partially constructed already but pick up qualities as I make sense of their scapes.